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Training Tips for Chicks: The Process

If you are new to the Chicks Training Tips take a few minutes to read the previous newsletters, there’s a lot of great information in there!

It’s incredibly beneficial for all the Chicks to be introduced to new movements and concepts for training, implementing these in a regular workout in almost any fashion will create positive change. So re-read the first 10 installments to get a look at all the great movements, VIDEOS have been included:

This is a huge training resource for you all!

Now on to the meat of the matter.

This Newsletter’s training tip is called “The Process”

I’ve endeavored to give you all training program outlines for climbing fitness. Now I’d like to fill my roll as a coach to talk about the “process” of climbing as far as getting “better”.

So often we are our own worst enemy, putting too much pressure on ourselves or having unrealistic expectations about progress, where we should be and what it takes to break through a plateau in our climbing.

It’s a process.
I’d like to clear up a few things before we start, you can repeat this to yourself whenever you doubt yourself.
First: all climbers have been afraid.
Second: everyone worked hard to be where they are.
Third: everyone has had a bad day.
Fourth: everyone has cried about it at some point, or had a tantrum, or sulked, or gone into some crazed depression…I know just over the sport of climbing.

Embrace this and know it. If you see people climbing hard understand they worked to get there. If they can’t admit to you they’ve struggled, they are a douche bag. Ignore them.

Now let’s get on with the process.

All climbers begin by steadily improving and working through the grades, sport or trad. Just by going climbing and trying you will get better. At some point however you will hit your first plateau. 5.9, 5.10, 5.12 wherever it is and believe me there are many plateaus to be hit, you will hit yours. At this point the process requires a different approach.

Suddenly you need to “train” and you need to fail, and then try and try and try again to succeed. This is the process. If you want to gain the skill, strength, and ability to climb beyond your plateau.

Challenge yourself to try routes, or boulder problems that you think you can’t touch. So you can only link a few moves at a time. Perfect. Two things happen when you try. First you become stronger. Finger and contact strength (it’s like a heavy lift) in addition your body begins to “learn” new movement. Feel confident and comfortable to rehearse movements. Then begin linking moves. If you try a new route or boulder problem and in one week you manage to get one move further you’ve made progress. Try and fail try and fail try and fail…then try and Succeed! Once your body understands what it feels like, what it takes to climb the next grade harder the next route will be easier. Mentally and physically.

One last note. Once you break through the 5.10 barrier each letter grade represents a new level of difficulty. The difference between 10a and 10d is much greater than 5.8 to 5.9. Honor each grade, and progress accordingly. If you struggle to complete your first 10a and you want to climb 5.11 then you must embrace the process. Onsight or Redpoint,  complete the routes clean after working on them: Ten 5.10a’s, Seven 5.10b’s, Five 5.10c’s, Three 5.10d’s, then try 5.11a. Build a foundation of fitness, technique and strength to launch from. You can apply this process to all the grades.

Final Note:
Happy Climbing! Enjoy the Process!

As always: for more detailed information regarding training you can contact me at  www.rippleffectraining.com or e-mail me.

Carolyn Parker

Training Tips for Chicks: Have A Plan

If you are new to the Chicks Training Tips take a few minutes to read the previous newsletters, there’s a lot of great information in there!

Handstand Hold

Handstand Hold

Its incredibly beneficial for all the Chicks to be introduced to new movements and concepts for training, and initially implementing these in a regular workout in almost any fashion will create positive change. So re-read the first installments to get a look at all these great movements videos have been included:

  • Shoulder Openers – Shoulder flexibility and ROM
  • Modified Cuban Press – Rotator Cuff strengthening and posture correction, with scapular area strengthening, and overhead ROM.
  • Wall Squat, Goblet Squat, Push ups, Walking Push Ups, Ring Push Ups
  • Archers, Leg Lower and Raise, KTE, L seats, Knee Raise, Static holds: FLR, ring support, DB Push Press, Plate OH Hold, Handstand Hold, Bench dip / ring dip
  • Pull Up, Body Row, Bent Over Row, High Pull, Pull Over, Walking Lunge, OH Walking Lunge, BSSU, SLSLDL, Front Raise, Lateral Raise Standing, Reverse Fly, Y’s with Bands, Low Trap Flys with bands, Deadlift, Front Squat.
  • As well as a few sample workouts (WOs).

In this next installment I’ll look at training vs. “exercise”: HAVE A PLAN!

By in large most people that come to me to train have specific goals in mind. For some its a race, for some to climb at a particular difficulty grade, maybe its for health reasons to combat the effects of the aging process, maybe for injury prevention or to bridge the gap between PT and Sport. Whatever the case may be, everyone has a goal and it includes measurable improvement. For most of us, “measurable” improvement is key and this requires a plan. It is also what separates training from exercise.
Exercise is good for us, most health professionals will tell you, you need 30 min a day, at a minimum, of cardiovascular work and strength training twice a week if over the age of 40. And in general, for health maintenance and overall “fit”ness this is adequate and what I call “exercise”.
However, if you have a specific goal and you want to improve at something or change your current situation then your mindset needs to change to that of actual “Training”. Otherwise, you will become frustrated with the outcome…stagnation.
Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.” A. Einstein.
How does one begin to train,  I encourage you to find quality professional guidance. You can do your homework first though:
  1. Make a list of goals, there can be more than one. From as simple as eliminate back pain or do a pull up, to Ice Climb in Iceland with Chicks guides.
  2. Assess your weaknesses, if you know them. And your strengths. Most of us already train our strengths because it makes us feel good, what we need to do to improve is target weaknesses with a vengeance.
  3. Look at your weekly life schedule and carve out realistic amounts of time to train and stick to it. If your training time goals are unrealistically high and you fail to meet your personal expectation you will be frustrated and additionally overly tired, not getting the benefit from the training you are doing. Train smart not hard. Less is more. Quality over quantity.
  4. Find some friends to train with, make plans to meet, accountability and motivation can be key factors to success. Your friends might have the same goals in mind and this may also be an avenue to affording professional help, do it in a group setting.
Once you’ve done these things is time to execute a plan.
Angela Allan, a “Chick” extraordinaire I met at the Rifle CO Clinic this last fall contacted me with one of the above goals. “Improve her climbing for her Chicks Ice Climbing Trip in Iceland”.
She sent me the answers to the above list, we had eight weeks which is plenty of time for someone with a strong foundation and experience. I created a training program specific to her goal, to fit her time frame, and that utilized tools that she had at her disposal living in AK. And voila 8 weeks later I get a text…it read.
“Hey Hey, Woman! Just wanted to send you an update as I’m finishing up the last week of training before Iceland!! Dip ladder is hell on earth…and weirdly, I love it! I can do more pull ups than I’ve ever been able to! Overall, I think this is a gateway to a new level of climbing for me! I’m so stoked for what’s next…and very grateful for your help!
All the best! Ang”
Besides the fact that this just gives me a big warm fuzzy that she is crushing, its proof to a point that focused training pays off.
Your homework for this newsletter: Set a goal, establish answers to I – IV, set a date, make a plan, execute.
It’s going to be rock climbing season soon, look forward to basic foundation training for rock climbing in our next installment!

Carolyn Parker
Athlete, Trainer, Guide
Founder Ripple Effect Training

Chicks Training Tips: Creating Regular Workouts

Written by: Carolyn Parker
GSquatIt’s incredibly beneficial for all adventurers to be introduced to new movements and concepts for training, and initially implementing these in a regular workout in almost any fashion will create positive change. So re-read the first six installments to get a look at all these great movements (with detailed videos):
  • Shoulder Openers – Shoulder flexibility and ROM
  • Modified Cuban Press – Rotator Cuff strengthening and posture correction, with scapular area strengthening, and overhead ROM
  • Wall Squat

Installment #2:

  • Goblet squat
  •  Push ups

Installment #3 (part 1):

  • Leg lower and raise
  • KTE
  • L seats
  • Knee raise
  • Static holds
  • FLR
  • Ring support

Installment #3 (part 2):

  • Push ups
  • Walking push ups
  • Ring push ups
  • Archers
Installment #3 (part 3):
  • Pull up
  • Body row
  • Bent over row
  • High pull
  • Pull over
  • Walking lunge
  • OH walking lunge
  • BSSU
  • SLSLDL

Installment #4:

  • Front raise
  • Lateral raise
  • Reverse fly
  • Y’s with bands
  •  Low trap flys with bands
  • Deadlift
  • Front squat
  • DB push press
  • Plate OH hold
  • Handstand hold
  • Bench dip / ring dip
Eventually the athlete will have built a good, broad foundation from which to launch their fitness to the next level. But how exactly is this done? Imagine being in an oar boat paddling to a destination, your goal.  If you just barely dig the paddle in a gently pull you may eventually get there but the current may pull you off course long before you arrive at your goal. Instead now it’s time to dig the paddle in deep, pull hard and set a course to confidently arrive at your destination and achieve your goals.
For our next installment I’ll begin the discussion of what a workout might look like when you start putting the movements together and structuring the sets and reps and load for strength gains. Remember we participate in a strength to weight ratio sport, all mountain sports are. We want to remain light and get strong! So here we go!
Without getting deep in the weeds we have a simple structure to workouts:
Part I) warm up – 10:00 of activity or movement to actually “warm” the body. Light jog, rowing machine, stationary bike, jumping rope all are great.
1a)Then a specific warm up is needed to not only for alignment but physical preparation for what is to come in the workout. If you spend 10 extra minutes warming up properly the return you get from your workout will be ten fold.
Part II) The core of the workout, this is the focus of the workout. Is it strength based, strength endurance, power endurance.
Part III) Usually we want to add a “supplemental” piece to the end of a training session. Often this targets either an area of identified weakness in the athlete or some part of the machine that has yet to be trained that day.
The following four workouts are examples of this idea of constructing a training session comprised of three parts. Remember we are just scratching the surface of strength training. If you have any questions, seek an education and coaching from a professional who can work with you directly.
Workout 1
Strength
Warm up 10:00 bike
Then:
Shoulder openers 2 x 8
Cuban Press 2 x 5
Y’s with Band 2 x 8
Wall squats  3 x 5
OH Walking Lunge 30m
Then:
Work up to heavy BSSU
Then:
5 x 3 (per leg) BSSU@_____
Then:
On rings
10x Archers + 10x Feet to Hands 5
rest 3:00
FLR 3 x 60 sec work/ 60 sec rest
Workout 2
Strength
Shoulder openers 2 x 8
Cuban Press 2 x 5
DB PP 2 x 8
Wall squats  3 x 5
Walking Lunge 30m
Then:
Work up to heavy SLSLDL
Then:
5 x 2 SLSLDL@ _____
In between sets:
Work up to heavy weighted pull up, 2 RM (Rep Max) hang weight from a harness at waist. If you are still working on pull ups this is the time to walk away from assistance and try jumping into a locked off pull up and slowly lower controlling the movement as a negative, these should feel hard! (5 x 2)
Then:
10x weighted leg lowers + 5x KB Bosu chest press
Rest as necessary
5 rounds
Workout 3

Warm up 10:00 Row, 5:00 minutes of the 10:00 sound be 30 secs hard, 30 sec easy to open up the pipes a bit.

Then:

wall squats 3 x5

goblet squats 2 x 10

shoulder openers 2 x 10

warm up to your deadlift weight

Then:

IWT

5x Deadlift+ 90 Sec Row, 2:00min rest

Three Rounds.

5 min rest

Then:

5x Front Squat + 90sec Airdyne 2:00min rest

Three Rounds

5:00min rest

Then:

7 x 15m KB Bear Crawl 2 @ 30 –  55# DBs or KBs

Workout 4
Warm up: 10 min row
Wall squats 3×5
Goblet squats 2x 10
Shoulder openers 2x 10
SLSLDL 3×5
Then:
Work up to heavy DL
Then 5 x 3 DL @ ______
rest 2-3 min between sets
(If the athlete is well conditioned a round of 5x Push up + 5x Pull up can be done between sets of Deadlifts.)
Then:
Finish with
1:00 Sit Ups
1:00 Mtn Climbers
1:00 Ring Support
1:00 rest
x 3
There are many, many elements to cover: frequency of workouts, what type of workout to do when, strength vs. power, what is power endurance. I will continue to cover these topics in the Chicks training newsletters and for more detailed information regarding programming of this nature you can contact me at www.rippleffectraining.com or info@rippleffectraining.com

Training Tips for Chicks: Pulling Strength & Ski Legs

If you are new to the Chicks Training Tips take a few minutes to read the previous posts, there’s a lot of great information in there.

Winter is on its way! For some of you snow has already fallen, puffy jackets, hats and gloves are out and skis are being dusted off with excitement for the winter! And if skiing isn’t your number one, I know ice climbing must be, so sharpen those tools and lace up those boots the ice is forming!

This installment will round off a few pulling strength movements for climbers the last of a three part series for climbing. Even though rock season is ending, ice is just around the corner. In addition, we will begin to introduce leg/ski specific training for winter fun – back or front country!

Once again gals, all the techniques and movements discussed in Chicks Training Tips are beneficial for all mountain athletes of all ages. The number one goal for fun is outdoor play, let’s enhance that fun, injury proof you and keep you stronger longer!

Let’s talk pulling!
We can pull in quite a few ranges of motion:

  • The Pull Up
  • The Row
  • The High Pull
  • The Pull Over

If you remember from previous newsletters we want to target, more sets x fewer more demanding reps. If you can easily perform 10 reps of any of these exercises it’s time to make it harder gals! 5 x 5, 5 x 3, 6 x 2. Review the Stronger Not Bigger post for more information.

Pull Ups
Rings or Bar, If you can’t yet do pull ups on your own grab a band (jumpstretch) for assistance and avoid machines that push on your feet or knees. Your body needs to learn and master stabilizing itself through the range of motion (ROM) of the pull up.

Try to pull from full extension, leading with the chest/sternum raised to completion of elbows back and looking over the bar. Let’s say you can do a ton of pull ups already…try adding weight to your body to make it harder, you can hang a kettle ball (KB) from your harness.

Rows
Body Row or Bent Over Row
The Body Row is done using a bar in a squat rack and a bench. The movement must be performed in the full ROM for full benefit. This means chest to the bar for each rep. Begin with the easiest movement with both feet on the ground, advance to one foot on the ground and one on the bench and then both heels on the bench. Stabilize the body, activate the glutes and core and pull your chest up rather than thrusting the hips.

The Bent Over Row is another great movement that also establishes good connection with the posterior chain: glutes, low back, hamstrings. Tools you can are DBs, KBs, or a barbell the movement is the same. Begin standing, creating a slight bend in the knees then activate hamstrings and glutes. Hinge forward, keeping the back flat and spine neutral. Stabilize and protect the low back. Once leaning forward to a point where the torso is almost parallel with the floor, pull or row the hands toward the chest. Drive the elbows back and remember to stop the movement for a second once hands reach your chest before lowering and repeating!

High Pull
I do this movement with a lighter barbell, DBs or KBs just to keep the movement and the strength balanced in the shoulders.

Pull Over
I usually use KBs for this movement, you can use a barbell as well. Laying on the floor, place the weight above your head only far enough away that you can grab the KB with bent elbows, do not try this with straight arms! The spine should be neutral and the core stabilized. Raise the KB off the floor till just above the chest then lower to the ground and repeat. As you lower the KB it is critical that you stabilize your spine and do not let the low back arch.

Ok gals! Previous posts have given a host of core and upper body strength movements for climbing and all mountain sports, let’s get strong!

And now to check in with the foundation of leg strength. The first thing I check with all incoming athletes is single leg movements.

Lunge
In your warm up add the Walking Lunge and OH walking Lunge to prepare the body neuro-muscularly. The stride should be such that the legs end up at 90 degree angles, your torso should stay erect and the head, shoulder, hip, knee (posterior) should remain in alignment through out the movement. Stride should be a hip width stance, do not walk as though you are on a balance beam, take at least 10 steps forward then reverse the movement, going backward is quite hard. Then add weight (light) in one hand overhead, try forward and backward with each arm. 10 steps.

Now you are ready to begin testing both the SLSLDL – Single Leg Straight Leg Dead Lift and the BSSU – Back Squat Step Up. Try these two movements on different days. It can take a bit of time to work through both. You will likely discover that you have an imbalance between your legs. It may be minimal or profound. All sports, skiing, climbing, trail running, cycling utilize our legs in a single leg fashion. We are limited by our weaker limb so let’s train that leg to be stronger!

Single Leg Straight Leg Dead Lift
Single leg movements take a great deal of focus and attention to do properly, continue to practice and pay attention to the details.

Squat down and pick up the barbell or KB you are going to use with proper form. Begin in an upright position, take a single step forward and activate that leg. Retract the shoulder blades, engage the entire posterior chain, keep your hips and shoulders square and level through out the movement then raise the non-standing leg to initiate the movement. Keep both glutes active, hinge forward till BB or KB touches the floor stand back up, re-stabilize and repeat.

Back Squat Step Up
On a 14 – 18” box, depending on your height. Begin by placing a PVC or broom stick, or light bar on the back as if in back squat position. Place one leg on the box as if you are going to do a step up, come up on your tip toe on the foot on the floor then press with the leg on the box to step up, do not push off the floor. This is a difficult movement to master, we usually want to push off the floor but try and activate the working leg and isolate it.

Ok gals! Test out your leg strength, see which leg is stronger, start using more weight for both movements.

If you remember from previous newsletters we want to target, more sets x fewer more demanding reps. If you can easily perform 10 reps of any of these exercises it’s time to make it harder gals! 5 x 5, 5 x 3, 6 x 2. Review the Stronger Not Bigger post for more information.

Balance the body but remember do not train the stronger leg more than the weaker, catch the weak leg up.

Next few installments we will visit two leg strength movements, stabilize our shoulders, talk about power production and more advanced core stability! We are just scratching the surface of strength training. There are many many elements to cover, frequency of workouts, what type of workout to do when, strength vs. power, what is power endurance.

We will continue to cover these topics in the Chicks Blog or you can have them delivered to your inbox by signing up for the Chicks Newsletter.  For more detailed information regarding programming of this nature you can contact me at  www.rippleffectraining.com or via e-mail.

Signing off for now,
Carolyn Parker