Sterling Quest 9.6mm Rope | Gear We Use

 

Stock image of Sterling Quest rock climbing rope

Sterling Quest 9.6mm Rope

Have you heard about the Sterling Quest 9.6 millimeter rope?

The Quest is perfect if you’ve been hemming and hawing about what kind of rope to get. It might just be the one-quiver, single, dynamic rope that you’ve been looking for. 

When purchasing a rope it’s always been hard to decide between a rope that is well-suited for lots of toproping like the Sterling Velocity or a lightweight, lead rope like the Sterling Nano.

Well, the good news is that you don’t have to make that choice anymore. Now, there is the Sterling Quest: a one-quiver rope that’s both durable and fairly lightweight. 

The Quest is a great rope whether you’re going sport-climbing, trad-climbing, heading out in your backyard or looking for new adventures.

At a diameter of 9.6 mm and a weight of 61 g/m, the Quest has a really nice balance between weight and durability. You can still carry it to the crag without breaking your back, and it’ll feel fine hanging off your waist for that send you’re working on. 

The Quest’s new core construction gives it some serious mileage potential so it won’t be shredded after one season.

The Quest also has a good handle. It’s made with a smooth sheath, which reduces drag against gear and helps let it slide smoothly through your belay device.

With an impact force of 9.1 kN*, which is only very slightly higher than the Velocity, and with 29% dynamic elongation, the Quest provides a soft catch with good belaying skills.

Sterling makes this rope in a variety of choices. You can choose from bare-bones 60m, single-color ropes (which still come with a middle mark) to top-notch, bi-color, dry-treated versions. Sterling’s Quest 9.6mm comes in several different lengths between 40m and 80m.

The Quest has lots of important attributes united into one rope. So, go ahead and fret no more… Sterling’s Quest 9.6mm rope will make a good companion no matter what your climbing goals are!

*This is an international testing standard, not the actual force on a falling climber!

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