Advanced At-Home Workouts

Click below to find:

Beginner Isolation Workouts – Exercise At Home

Exercise At Home – Intermediate Workouts

Advanced At-Home Workouts

Warmup

10 min of walking, light jog, heavy house work like vacuuming, wrestling with kids, zumba video! You get the idea! Get your heart rate up and get warm.

2 x 8 shoulder opener, with belt, ski pole, yoga strap, jump rope, towel.

2 x 5 push up, counter top, knees or toes.

3 x 5 air squats or sit to stands – imagine that wall is in front of you.

Advanced At-Home Workout 1

Warm-up (see above)

Then:

60 sec jog in place, lifting your knees as high as you can

30 sec easy jog in place, no additional rest

5 rounds

Then:

10 x sit up 

10 x leg raise/lower 

10 x  windshield wiper (10 per side) 

rest 30 secs

5 rounds

Then: 

10 x burpee

10 x body rows (a tree branch or playground equipment will also work for this) or Bent Over Row (If you are stuck indoors, fill a backpack with weight, or two water bottles/gallon jugs.)

10 x split jump

minimal rest

5 rounds

Cool Down with some light mobility

Advanced At-Home Workout 2

Warm-up (see above)

Then:

For time:

20 x jumping jack

20 sec plank

20 x air squat

20 sec plank

20 x mountain climber per leg

20 sec plank

20 x lunges in place – 10 per leg

20 sec plank

20 x side plank with a hip lower and lift (count 10 per side)

20 sec plank

20 x squat jumps

20 sec plank

20 x burpees

3:00 min rest

4 rounds

Cool Down with some light mobility

Advanced At-Home Workout 3

Warm-up (see above)

Then:

6 x 30 sec push ups / 30 sec plank (6 min total)

2:00 rest

6 x 30 sec air squat / 30 sec hold in the bottom of the squat (6 min total)

2:00 rest

6 x 30 sec sit ups / 30 sec hold straight legs elevated 6” off the floor (6 min total)

2:00 rest

6 x 30 sec windshield wiper / 30 sec flutter kick (6 min total)

2:00 rest

6 x 30 sec lunges in place / 30 sec “rest” jog in place (6 min total)

2:00 rest

6 x 30 sec bicycles / 30 sec mountain climbers (6 min total)

Cool Down with some light mobility

 

Carolyn Parker

Founder, Instructor, Athlete, Mountain Guide

970-773-3317 work cell

Founder Ripple Effect Training

Coach for Uphill Athlete

AMGA Certified Rock Guide

Gym Jones, Fully Certified Instructor

Exercise At Home – Intermediate Workouts

It is very important to exercise even when we are stuck at home.

Try these intermediate workouts for an at-home exercise routine that you can do in your living room.

If these are too hard or you are just starting, here are the Beginner Isolation Workouts.

Do one of these workouts, or two of them, or all of them in a day.

Look for a third set of advanced workouts that will build on this week’s workouts in the next regular Chicks Email.  Stay tuned and stay fit!

If you’re further committed to training and need additional support, or you need more video instruction, you can email me at carolyn@rippleffectraining.com and I’ll send you an access code to Ripple Effect’s private, training-video database.

All my best!

Carolyn

Carolyn Parker demonstrates a side plank exercise at home

Exercise at home! Carolyn Parker, Founder Ripple Effect Training, demonstrates a living room side plank.

Isolation Workouts − Warm Up

10 min of walking, light jog, heavy house work like vacuuming, wrestling with kids, zumba video! You get the idea! Get your heart rate up and get warm.

2 x 8 shoulder opener, with belt, ski pole, yoga strap, jump rope, towel.

2 x 5 push up, counter top, knees or toes.

3 x 5 air squats or sit to stands – imagine that wall is in front of you.

Also check out Fitness – Build a Solid Fitness Foundation.

At Home – Intermediate Workout 1

Warm-up (see above)

Then:

30 sec jog in place, lifting your knees as high as you can

30 sec easy jog in place

30 sec rest

4 rounds

Then:

10 x sit up 

10 x leg raise/lower

10 x windshield wiper (10 per side) 

rest 60 secs

4 rounds

Then: 

8 x push ups 

10 x door-frame, body row (Grab door, pull body forward and release body away to make a body row movement.)

or fill a backpack with weight, or two water bottles/gallon jugs and do a bent over row.

10 x split jump

minimal rest

5 rounds

Cool Down with some light mobility 

At Home – Intermediate Workout 2

Warm-up (see above)

 

20 x jumping jack

20 x air squat

20 x mountain climber per leg

20 x lunges in place – 5 per leg

20 x side plank with a hip lower and lift (that’s what you are counting 5 per side)

20 x squat jumps

20 x burpees

Rest as necessary 

3 rounds

 

Cool Down with some light mobility

At Home – Intermediate Workout 3

Warm-up (see above)

 

4 x 30 sec push ups / 30 sec plank – 4 min total

1:00 rest

4 x 30 sec air squat / 30 sec hold in the bottom of the squat – 4 min total

1:00 rest

4 x 30 sec sit up / 30 sec with straight legs elevated 6” off the floor – 4 min total

1:00 rest

4 x 30 sec windshield wiper / 30 sec flutter kick – 4 min total

1:00 rest

4 x 30 sec lunges in place/30 sec “rest” jog in place – 4 min total

1:00 rest

4 x 30 sec bicycles / 30 sec mountain climbers – 4 min total

 

Cool Down with some light mobility

Isolation Workouts – Exercise At Home

Isolation Workouts 

Across our nation and across the globe we’re all being impacted by the rapid spread of the coronavirus. Many are under “shelter at home” restrictions, juggling life with kids at home too. Many are far worse off. Some will not get sick, some will. I send my best to all of those who have lost a family member, or who are caring for someone who is seriously ill. It takes its toll.

In times like these, it’s difficult to take care of ourselves.

We’re thrown out of routine without a way to get outside or go to a gym. But it’s important to try and stay healthy so you can help those around you! 

Remember that physical and mental health are inseparable. Exercise has an important, positive impact on mental health. We need to keep exercising even when we are sheltering at home.

You can do one of these workouts, or two of them or all of them in a day.

Next week, I’ll send out a second set of Isolation Workouts that build on this week’s workouts.  So stay tuned!

If you’re further committed to training and need additional support, or you need more video instruction, you can email me at carolyn@rippleffectraining.com and I’ll send you an access code to Ripple Effect’s private, training-video database.

All my best to you!

Carolyn 

Isolation Workouts − Warm Up

10 min of walking, light jog, heavy house work like vacuuming, wrestling with kids, zumba video! You get the idea! Get your heart rate up and get warm.

2 x 8 shoulder opener, with belt, ski pole, yoga strap, jump rope, towel.

2 x 5 push up, counter top, knees or toes.

3 x 5 air squats or sit to stands – imagine that wall is in front of you.

Also check out Fitness – Build a Solid Fitness Foundation.

Beginner Isolation Workout 1 – Strength

Warm-up (see above)

Then:

5 x sit up 

5 x leg raises/lifts

10 x windshield wiper (5 per side) 

Rest 60 secs

4 Rounds

Then: 

5 x push ups 

10 x door-frame body row (Grab door, pull body forward and release body away to make a body row movement.)

10 x lunges 

rest 60 secs

4 rounds

 

Cool Down – with some light mobility

Beginner Isolation Workout 2  Aerobic

Warm-up (see above)

Then:

10 x Jumping Jack

10 x Air Squat

10 x Mtn climber per leg

10 x Lunges in place – 5 per leg

10 x Side plank – hip lower and lift (that’s what you are counting 5 per side)

10 x Squat Jumps

10 x Burpees

2 times through all – rest as necessary 

Then:

Cool Down – with some light mobility

Beginner Isolation Workout 3 – Anaerobic

Warm-up (see above)

Then:

3 x 30 sec work/30 sec rest – Push Ups – 3 min total

Then 1:00 rest

3 x 30 sec work/30 sec rest – Air Squats – 3 min total

Then 1:00 rest

3 x 30 sec work/30 sec rest – Sit Ups – 3 min total

Then 1:00 rest

3 x 30 sec work/30sec rest – Windshield Wiper – 3 min total

Then 1:00 rest

3 x 30 sec work/30sec rest – Lunge in Place – 3 min total

Then 1:00 rest

3 x 30 sec work/30 sec rest – Floor Bicycles – 3 min total

Then:

Cool down with light aerobic work or stretching 10min.

Lock-Off Training for Mixed Climbing

Carolyn Parker lock off training for mixed climbing.

Carolyn Parker lock-off training for mixed climbing. Begin with tools (dowels) at the same height.  © Carolyn Parker.

Winter is ice and mixed climbing season in Colorado.

If you haven’t tried it, mixed climbing is a blast!

Tools that you’d normally apply by swinging and kicking into ice are now placed carefully onto rock. Then you balance on front points and move around your placement in an entirely new way.

Mixed climbing requires a new set of abilities and one that’s particularly helpful is lock-off ability.

Learn more about mixed climbing here.

However, all climbing requires strong, stable shoulders, not just mixed climbing. So, before you train lock-off strength, make sure your shoulders are strong. Find out more about Shoulder Strength.

Now, if you’re all set with strong shoulders, we’re going to add in some lock-off practice. 

Remember, we always want to take as much load as possible with our feet, legs and core. For more about lock-off technique and another great lock-off strength training exercise called The Hover, go to my previous post Lock-Off Strength.

But sometimes we need to hold our body with a single arm (plus the aforementioned) for a few moments while we find just the right crack or edge to set our tool securely.  In which case we may need to “lock-off” at different angles while in a pulling position.

Lock-Off Training for Mixed Climbing

Ideally use ice climbing tools. However, dowels (or something similar) that allow you to hang with your hand, wrist and grip in a position that mimics holding an ice climbing tool also works. (If using tools, prep them by wrapping the pick in cardboard and tape so it doesn’t chew up your gym’s pull-up bar, rings or climbing holds.)

Warm Up First:

Do a few minutes of light aerobic work to get your blood flowing.

Then follow my Strong Shoulders workout for a perfect warm-up before lock-off training for mixed climbing. 

Add a few push ups and pull ups (can be assisted) 3 sets of 5 of each.

Lock-Off Drills:

Begin with tools (dowels) at the same height. (See above.)

Carolyn Parker lock off training for mixed climbing in position one

Pull up and hold for three seconds at the top of the pull up.

Then lower to 45 degrees and hold for three seconds.

Carolyn Parker lock off training for mixed climbing in position three

Lower to 90 degrees and hold for three seconds.

Lower to 120 degrees and hold for three seconds.

Lower almost all the way (back to first photo position at top) but keep a slight bend in your elbows and your shoulder blades stable with back muscles engaged. Hold for three seconds. 

Rest for 60 seconds and then repeat 2 more times for 3 total reps.

Now try the same thing with your arms offset. 

Place one tool higher than the other.

Now do the same drill: three reps of three lock-off positions with right tool higher, three reps with left tool higher. The lower arm will take the most load in the offset position.

Total rep count for the entire series is only nine but this is difficult.

Have no fear. If you cannot do pull-ups, you can try all of this with a band for some assistance. 

Over time you can add reps or sets as your body adapts.

 

Carolyn Parker

Founder, Instructor, Athlete, Mountain Guide

970-773-3317 work cell

Founder Ripple Effect Training

Coach for Uphill Athlete

AMGA Certified Rock Guide

Gym Jones, Fully Certified Instructor

Training Partners

Carolyn Parker and training partner working on pull up together

Carolyn Parker and training partner working on some ring pull ups.

Hey Chicks,

Today we’re going to chat about the benefit of training partners. Training partners can be your ticket to motivation and success, not to mention safety.

We spend so much effort self-motivating. Sometimes it helps to know someone is ready to meet you. Just past the shortest day of the year in the Northern Hemisphere, motivation can be tough.

Reach out to your girlfriends. I’ll bet they’d love to join in on some training and a bit of social catch-up time. It seems that life doesn’t afford us enough quality time with our friends .

Training Partner Benefits

1) Accountability

6 am. The alarm goes off. You really want to go back to bed. You don’t want to get up in the dark, go to the gym, go on that run, throw on a weighted pack and walk on a treadmill, but you do. Why? Because, someone is there waiting for you and you’re not going to be that person and bail.

2) Safety

A spot when you’re strength training is never a bad idea.It is also good to have someone watching for form.

3) Assistance

While you’re trying to do your first pull up, your partner can help.

4) Partnership

You can do work/rest sets or throw a medicine ball back and forth for core work.

5) Cheers!

It is a definite benefit to have someone to cheer you on! Everyone likes a little encouragement now and again. And it makes training a lot more fun.

Happy Solstice, winter, skiing, ice climbing and all your fun outdoor adventures!!

Carolyn

You might also be interested in

Swing! Training For Ice Climbing

Train Muscular Endurance For Ice Climbing

If you need training information for a specific climb or trip of any nature you can contact me at:

970-773-3317
Carolyn Parker
Carolyn Parker
Founder, Instructor, Athlete, Mountain Guide
970-773-3317 work cell
Founder Ripple Effect Training

Strength Training For Backcountry Skiing

strength Training for backcountry skiing helps Angela Hawse make perfect turns in Iceland

Strength Training For Backcountry Skiing helps Angela Hawse, Co-Owner Chicks Skiing make perfect turns. Iceland, 2019

Hey Skiing Chicks!

I hope you enjoyed last month’s training tip: Uphill Training for Backcountry Skiing workout because now it’s time to add in strength for the downhill skiing part.

After a month of building uphill stamina in your legs and lungs, we need to build a reserve of strength and power for the downhill.

All the exercises in this Downhill Training for Backcountry Skiing workout link to videos of the movements. The full workout takes just over an hour with a few minutes extra for cool down. As always, if you’re unsure about a movement, hire a professional coach. A coach can help you train properly and stay injury free.

Ideally, plan strength workouts after rest days and one or two times a week, depending on your time and your fitness.

Commit to this workout 1-2 days a week for 4-6 weeks and enjoy the benefits come December! (Or whenever ski season begins for you.)

Strength Training For Backcountry Skiing Workout:

Warm up:

10:00 mins row, run, ski erg etc.

2 x 8 Shoulder openers

2 x 5 Cuban press

3 x 5 Wall squat 

2 x 5 Squat jump

Then:

Find your weight and box of appropriate height.

5x

5 Goblet Squat + 8 Box Jump @ 12 – 24” (If no box available you can substitute jump with a KB swing.)

Then:

5x

60 sec wall sit with a weight in your lap (medicine ball or slam ball work well)

30 secs split jumps

Rest 60 secs

Then:

3x

10x Push up

10x Leg lower

Cool down with light aerobic work and mobility:

15 Minutes of Mobility | Mobility Exercises For Performance and Injury Prevention

If you need information for a specific climb or trip of any nature you can contact me at:

carolyn@rippleffectraining.com

970-773-3317

 

Carolyn Parker

Founder, Instructor, Athlete, Mountain Guide

Founder Ripple Effect Training

AMGA Certified Rock Guide

Coach for Uphill Athlete
Gym Jones, Fully Certified Instructor

Uphill Training For Backcountry Skiing | Chicks Skiing – Training Tip

Carolyn Parker skiing uphill in Iceland

Carolyn Parker backcountry ski touring uphill – skinning in Iceland ©Robbie Klimek

 

Are you stoked to get into backcountry skiing this winter?

Maybe you’ve registered for an Avalanche Rescue course and an Intro to Backcountry Skills course with Chicks? Maybe you’re a more advanced skier and it’s off to Hokkaido, Japan in January for you!

Whatever the case may be, for backcountry skiing we need to build a good aerobic base for skinning on the way up. And we need sufficient leg power for the way down.

Ultimately, the goal is to be able to carve epic turns in fluffy, pillowy powder for days on end.

If backcountry skiing is your game, you’ll need both uphill stamina and downhill strength.

Uphill training is dramatically different than going on a run around the neighborhood. If you live in an area where hills are available, it’s time to log some vertical outside. If there are no hills for you, get on a stepmill or treadmill at 10 – 15% grade with a light pack or weight vest or find some stairs (the more the better) and start logging some up hill training time for winter fun. If you can get outside, use ski poles or trekking poles to assist on the uphill and to condition your arms for poling.

We’ve got eight weeks to prep for ski season. Then, in December, we’ll start to fine-tune our skills on the slopes.

This training tip focuses on the aerobic conditioning part. In two weeks, I’ll send out the strength training details. However, if you already strength train, keep it going as outlined in the chart below.

Uphill Training For Backcountry Skiing Calendar:

*For all uphill training go at a comfortable, conversational pace or practice nose breathing.

A slow pace helps build a base and it won’t over work you, you’ll be able to recover and train (or ski) multiple days in a row.

 

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Rest Day Strength Uphill training, 60 min Uphill training, 60 min Rest Day Uphill training, 60 min Uphill training, 60 min
Rest Day Strength Uphill training, 60 min Uphill training, 60 min Rest Day Uphill training, 75 min Uphill training, 75 min
Rest Day Strength Uphill training, 60 min add pack or weight vest 10# Uphill training, 60 min add pack or weight vest 10# Rest Day Uphill training, 75 min add  pack or weight vest 10# Uphill training, 90 min
Recovery Week Strength Uphill training, 60 min Uphill training, 60 min Rest Day Uphill training, 90 min
Rest Day Strength Uphill training, 60 min add pack or weight vest 15# Uphill training, 60 min add pack or weight vest 15# Rest Day Uphill training, 90 min add pack for weight vest 15# Uphill training, 90 min
Rest Day Strength Uphill training, 60 min add pack or weight vest 15# Uphill training, 60 min add pack or weight vest 15# Rest Day Uphill training, 90 min add pack or weight vest 15# Uphill training, 120 min
Rest Day Strength Uphill training, 60 min add pack or weight vest 20# Uphill training, 60 min add pack or weight vest 20# Rest Day Uphill training, 120 min add pack or weight vest 20# Uphill training, 120 min
Recovery Week Strength Uphill training, 60 min Uphill training, 60 min Rest Day Uphill training, 120 min Rest Day

Once the snow flys and you are skinning and skiing for days you’ll be so stoked that you took the time to training properly.

Stay tuned for strength!

All my best,

Carolyn

If you need information for a specific climb or trip of any nature you can contact me at:

carolyn@rippleffectraining.com

970-773-3317

Carolyn Parker

Founder Ripple Effect Training

AMGA Certified Rock Guide

Carolyn’s Quick and Dirty Core Strength for Chicks

basic plank demonstration

Basic Plank

Core strength is critical to all sports, climbing and skiing included.

We so often seem to run out of time. Or we fall into the pattern of doing the same old thing because we don’t have time to think of new stuff.

Whether you are a beginner or a crusher, my quick and dirty core routine has basic, intermediate and advanced versions.

The routine builds off of 4 movements: leg lowers, windshield wipers, sit-ups and plank. Together, these four movements target prone and supine stabilization as well as flexion and rotation:

Basic Core Strength:

Start with 5­­–10 repetitions of leg lowers, then 5-10 repetitions of windshield wipers, then 5–10 repetitions of sit-ups, then 30 secs of plank.

Rest 60 seconds and then do another set.

Do 3–5 sets depending on how fit you are and how much time you have.

Work up to 5 rounds of 10 reps of each exercise and 60 sec plank.

Intermediate Core Strength:

Start with 5­­–10 anchored leg lowers, then 5­­–10 weighted windshield wipers, then 5­­–10 weighted sit ups, then finish with 30 sec front leaning rest (FLR).

Rest 60 seconds and then do another set.

Work up to 5 rounds of 10 reps each and 60 sec of FLR.

 

Front Leaning Rest

Front Leaning Rest

Advanced Core Strength:

Start with 5­­–10 elevated/weighted leg lowers, then 5­­–10 hanging windshield wipers, then 5­­–10 knees to elbows, then finish with FLR plus one push up every 10 secs for a total of 6 push ups in the minute (can drop to the knees for the push ups if necessary).

Rest 60 seconds and then do another set.

Have fun with these core workouts. Unless you are familiar with these movements and 100% sure you can do them properly, I suggest everyone begin with basic then move to intermediate if you aren’t terribly sore the next day and stick with intermediate for a few weeks or months before moving on the advanced.

Contact me for further training information and programming

@Carolyn Parker

carolyn@rippleffectraining.com

970-773-3317

Founder Ripple Effect Training

When Rest Is Best

Relax. ©Carolyn Parker

It’s August and rock climbing season is in full swing.

It’s a good time for a mid-season check in.

I always check in with my athletes before we start training. I check in to make sure they aren’t working around pain or discomfort.

Recently a young, strong athlete came into my gym for her training session. Let’s call her Lucy.

When I checked in with Lucy, she sheepishly admitted that her shoulder had flared up again—it felt irritated, like her old injury was coming back.

Lucy also admitted to tripling up on strength training, adding a fingerboard workout, and lots of rock climbing. She was motivated and pushing hard because she had just “sent” her first 5.12.

However, Instead of continuing with her training session, I sent Lucy home. What Lucy really needed was to take a week off and to get a massage. I also explained to her the importance of learning to “listen” to her body.

Learning to listen to what your body is telling you is the most effective path to continued improvement.

Lucy did as I recommended and I’m happy to report she is now back on track, pain free.

The problem of not listening to our bodies arises because it is too much fun getting stronger, progressing, and climbing well. We get attached to the fun.

However, our bodies need to rest and recover and they start to send us messages when it’s time. It’s best to listen and not ignore these signs.

Why do we need rest and when?

Stress is stress: training stress, work stress, general life stress. All stress needs to be balanced with adequate sleep, good nutrition, time with friends, and time for you. I cycle all my athletes through harder and easier weeks, tapering before big events or climbs, and active recovery weeks afterward.

Most of us love to continue to do what we love to do. However, in order to continue to do what we love without getting injured, we must rest and recover. Also, the best path to continuing to get better, fitter, faster, stronger, is through rest and deep recovery.So, if you haven’t taken appropriate rest, gotten a massage, spent time on deep recovery now may be the time!

Schedule some you-time, take a nap, eat some vegetables, laugh with a friend and attend to any aches or pains before they become an injury that shuts you down.

Until next time!

All my best,

Carolyn

 

Contact me for further training information and programming @

Carolyn Parker

carolyn@rippleffectraining.com

970-773-3317

Founder Ripple Effect Training

Mobility Exercises for Performance and Injury Prevention | 15 Minutes of Mobility

Go-Go-Go! “I know, I should go to yoga”

Today I want to stress the importance of a proper warm-up and mobility exercises. It is important to do 15 Minutes of Mobility both before AND after any activity. If you do 15 Minutes of Mobility in a mindful way, you’ll get 10x the gain from your workouts and you’ll get fewer injuries!

I call it “too-much-of-a-good-thing” syndrome.

We love climbing and skiing so much. These activities calm our minds and feed our souls. But too much repetitive movement can create structural imbalances. And left uncorrected, these imbalances can lead to pain and injury. In addition, most of us sit too much: 10 – 12  hours a day on average.

If you don’t know by now, sitting is horrible for you:

http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/adult-health/expert-answers/sitting/faq-20058005

https://www.washingtonpost.com/apps/g/page/national/the-health-hazards-of-sitting/750/

http://www.popsci.com/science/article/2013-02/many-reasons-chair-killing-you)

So, even if you think you’re active, you probably sit too much. Even if you always exercise after work and hit it hard on the weekends–you still probably commute to work sitting and drive a desk all day.

Loss of mobility causes pain whether it is in the back, neck, shoulders, or hips. Loss of mobility creates range-of-motion issues, muscle imbalances, and joint stress.

15 Minutes of Mobility Exercises

Doing these exercises will create a neuromuscular stimulus that turns on under-performing muscles and “chills-out” overactive muscles, increasing mobility over time.  

Execute the movements precisely. Stay in alignment and build balanced strength. As a result, you’ll be stronger and with the added benefit of decreasing your risk of injury.

Remember quality over quantity. Smarter, not harder, creates results.

(Don’t do any of these exercises if they cause pain.)

Before activity stretches should be dynamic: move in and out of the stretch, holding for 3 – 5 secs and repeat 10+ times.

After activity stretches should static: hold for 30+ sec to lengthen the muscle. Longer stretches fatigue muscles, so they shouldn’t be done before training or activity.

15 Minutes of Mobility

Upper body

Hold spine in neutral and the core stable so that your back doesn’t arch.

If these are easy, lay on a bench or foam roller to increase the available range of motion.

1) Chest Opener

chest opener exercise

15 Minutes of Mobility Exercises – chest opener

2) Elbows at Sides

mobility exercises - elbows at sides

15 Minutes of Mobility – elbows at sides

3) Overhead Reach

15 Minutes of Mobility – overhead reach

4) Shoulder Openers Video

Lower Body

For all stretches maintain a neutral lumbar spine and do not mash low back into the floor

1) Single-Leg Hamstring Stretch (Use a squat rack or door jam.)

15 Minutes of Mobility – single leg hamstring stretch

2) Hip Opening 

hip opening mobility exercise

15 Minutes of Mobility – hip opening

3) Lying On Back Twist

mobility exercises - back lying twist

15 Minutes of Mobility – back lying twist

4) Hip flexor (lie on bench, bed or chair)

hip flexor mobility exercise

15 Minutes of Mobility – hip flexor stretch

5) Frog stretch

hip mobility exercise - frog stretch

15 Minutes of Mobility – frog stretch

6) Quad stretch

quad stretch

15 Minutes of Mobility – Quad Stretch

7) Calf stretch (Ideally on a ramp but a step will work as well.)

calf stretch exercise

15 Minutes of Mobility – calf stretch

 

Carolyn Parker

Founder, Instructor, Athlete, Mountain Guide

970-773-3317 work cell

Founder Ripple Effect Training

Coach for Uphill Athlete

AMGA Certified Rock Guide

Gym Jones, Fully Certified Instructor